Tagged photography

The Puna: The Desert in Kodak TMax 400

“You know Robert Delpire a french photograph said one day that, ‘What I like in a photograph is the silence and black and white is silence.'” says Photographer Christophe Thillier, who states that he’s a big user of Kodak TMax 400 film in an email to us. Mr. Thillier is a geologist who works in remote places. He shares with us that he’s generally in deserts and that that’s where silence prevails. Deserts, where the light is extremely sharp and hard, also does well with Kodak TMax 400.

The Modern Photographer’s Guide to Kodak Tri-X (Premium)

For many years, photographers everywhere trusted Kodak Tri-x not only for its reliability, but also because it was simply just an incredible black and white film emulsion. Over the years it evolved and these days only the ISO 400 variant still remains. It’s a high speed film that is still in use with street photographers, documentary photographers, and well honestly a lot more than that. It’s prized for its look combined with it’s price point.

DIY: How to Build a Pinhole Camera (Premium)

The pinhole camera has been a classic DIY project for students discovering photography for many decades. If you want to get a deeper appreciation for the basic DNA of a camera, build a pinhole camera. Pinhole cameras are bare-bones cameras; they consist of a black box, a place to put photo-sensitive material, and a pinhole-sized opening that projects a faint image on light-sensitive material. Stripped of the bells and whistles, all cameras—film and digital—follow this design. Some (OK, almost all) cameras are more advanced. But DIY is making a comeback, especially among millennials, so, let’s make a pinhole camera!