From Gear

Papers that Every Photographer Serious About Printing Should Try

The best experiences for printing really come when you do it yourself. It’s really convenient to have CostCo, Adorama, or other services print for you. But they offer a very sort of standard type of paper. In fact, if you looked at what company sells the most paper in America, it would be Fujifilm. Fujifilm? Really, you say? Yes. Go to any pharmacy and get your images printed, they’ll be done on a Fujifilm glossy paper. Fujifilm for sure gives the absolute standard for what you get from most kiosks of some sort. But if you’re looking for a different look, it can be a bit confusing. So here are some of our favorite papers.

Report: Using Ilford Pan F Plus 50 with the New Sigma 14mm f1.8 Art Lens (Premium)

I like to equate my experience of film photography to that of the experience that the older generation of photographers who experienced digital for the first time. At 30 years old, I still haven’t had the opportunity or the time or step into the darkroom. I never had the opportunity to do it either in college or high school. So to continue with the evolution of film and how it can deliver pleasing images, I believe that using newer, sharper lenses designed with digital sensors in mind is a great way to get even more out of film. Ilford Pan F Plus is arguably the sharpest black and white film out there with TMax and Acros being a bit behind, but if it was sharp even in the days before all of these fantastic new lenses started coming out, then when using these new lenses the film should arguably be even better.

Using Ilford Disposable Cameras for Candid Photography (Premium)

If you’re reading this post, there are strong chances that you remember disposable cameras. My mother, who wasn’t that tech savvy at all, turned to them often when her Olympus camera broke. My college graduation was photographed on one in 2009 when I and many others had switched to digital point and shoots. My parents used them at events. So did my aunts and uncles. I always remember how fun they were–small, portable, and almost never reloadable until Lomography created their own reloadable versions earlier this year. So it was a complete blast from the past when I decided to try out Ilford’s disposable cameras.

Review: Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 Film (Premium)

Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 film is an exciting entry into the film photography world. It’s designed for street photography and is also designed to be nice and sharp. For the most part, it really is a sharp film. All of my testing has been with the Hexar AF–perhaps one of my favorite 35mm cameras of all time and perfect for capturing candid moments. So if you’re a street photographer looking to work with something different, then this is probably the film to get.

Using The Olympus OMD EM1 Mk II’s Grainy Film Mode with Neewer ND Filters

Over the years, Olympus has improved their grainy film modes over and over again. In the Pen f, the black and white filters can end up looking like Ilford Delta 400. But in the OMD EM1 Mk II, they resemble Tri-X a bit more. The only other company that really is able to pull off anything that looks remotely like film is Fujifilm–at least at the moment they are.

The Creation of a Street Photography Zine with WhiteWall

One of the myths around Street Photography is that it is an art-form you get into with no expectation of earning money or getting recognition. Though it may be easy to write it off as gospel, the truth is that recognition/generating sales in Street Photography is all about how you market yourself. In today’s uber-connected world there’s no shortage of places you can post your work – Instagram, Behance, or a personal website are all great places to start but if you want to get your work noticed by galleries then you’re going to need a printed portfolio of your work to really stand out.